Reasons driver’s licenses get suspended or revoked in Illinois

If you’re a driver in Illinois, just remember to follow the traffic laws as well as other non-driving related laws. If you don’t, you just may lose your driving privileges whether through a license suspension or revocation.

There’s a big difference between having a license suspended and having one revoked. For the former, there is an end date. But if your license is revoked, you’ve lost your driving privileges indefinitely. If your license has been revoked, you cannot apply for a new license for at least a year.

A number of reasons for losing a driver’s license

In Illinois, a person’s driver’s license can be suspended or revoked for a number of reasons by our Secretary of State office. They include:

  • Driving under the influence of alcohol or any illegal substance: If you’re convicted of a criminal DUI, your license will be revoked. After your first offense, it will be revoked for a year. A fourth and subsequent offense will lead to a lifetime revocation.
  • Leaving the scene of an accident with injury.
  • Failure to pay child support: This is part of the state’s “Deadbeats Don’t Drive” act.
  • Failure to pay any traffic tickets.
  • Getting too many traffic violations. If you get three within a year, your license will be suspended.
  • Failure to appear in court on a traffic violation.
  • Parking violations: Having 10 unpaid or more.
  • Automated traffic violations: If you’ve been photographed driving through a red traffic signal five times or more and have not paid the fines.
  • Safety responsibility violations: You may get up to two years suspension if you are driving without insurance and are considered at fault in a car accident.
  • Tollway violations: If you don’t pay your fines for five toll violations or more, you will get your license suspended.

In addition, driving with a suspended license may lead to jail time and the seizure of your vehicle.

A restricted driving permit will allow you to drive if you have a suspended or revoked license. You would be able to drive during certain times of the day and in specific designated areas. For example, you may be able to drive to work, medical appointments, day care and school.

Regardless, just remember to follow the traffic laws of Illinois, and please be a considerate driver who relies on common sense.

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